050-000-358 Beta-carotene (2%) (CAS: 7235-40-7)

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Product Name Beta-carotene (2%)
CAS No. 7235-40-7
Appearance Red-orange powder
Source Dunaliella salina (Nature Extract)
Keywords Beta-carotene (2%)
Related products Vitamin A, Vitamin B1, Vitamin C, Vitamin D3
EINECS-No. 230-636-6
Description

Description

Beta-carotene (2%) Description

Beta-carotene (2%) (CAS: 7235-40-7) is a strong antioxidant and also a scavenger of singlet oxygen. It is also a provitamin A as it can be converted into retinol. In commercial cherry tomato varieties, β-carotene content reached 1.2 mg per 100 g FW. The bioaccessibility of β-carotene from raw tomatoes was reported to be about 0.1%.

Beta-carotene (2%) Specifications

Product Name Zinc L-carnosine
CAS Registry Number 7235-40-7
Molecular Formula C40H56
Molecular Weight 536.9 g/mol
Particle Size 40mesh
Assay ≥2%
Moisture ≤7%
Heavy Metals ( Pb) ≤10
Ash ≤20%
Inorganic Arsenic (mg/Kg) ≤1.0
Aerobic Plant Count ≤30,000cfu/g
Mould & Yeast ≤100cfu/g
Coliform <30MPN/100g

Beta-carotene (2%) Applications:

Studies demonstrated the photoprotective effects of β-carotene on photooxidative damage and sunburn in humans. A significant reduction in erythema formation was also noticed when β-carotene was applied on human skin or with a dietary intervention alone or in combination with α-tocopherol for 12 weeks. Low concentrations of serum β-carotene have also been associated with an increased risk of congestive heart failure and cardiac death in men.[1]

Beta-carotene is reported to be a potent antioxidant and to protect the liver against the toxic effects of various drugs and xenobiotics.3 Studies with rats have shown that supplementation of beta carotene in diet prevented the ethanol-induced increase in the serum aminotransferases and to inhibit the depletion of the antioxidant molecule GSH in the liver.4 Additionally, in vitro studies with the hepatocytes isolated from the ethanol-fed rats have also shown that beta-carotene improved the cell viability and increased catalase activities and levels of glutathione.5 Mechanistic studies performed with the hepatocytes isolated from the ethanol-fed rats have also shown that beta carotene ameliorated the oxidative stress, enhanced antioxidant, and decreased the expression of CYP2E1 and apoptosis.[2]

 

Reference

P.Padmanabhan, A.Cheema, G.Paliyath: Solanaceous Fruits Including Tomato, Eggplant, and Peppers. https://doi.org/10.1016/B978-0-12-384947-2.00696-6

 

Manjeshwar ShrinathBaliga, Arnadi RamachandrayyaShivashankara, SunithaVenkatesh, Harshith P.Bhat, Princy LouisPalatty, GaneshBhandari, SureshRao: Dietary Interventions in Liver Disease Foods, Nutrients, and Dietary Supplements 2019, Pages 79-89; Chapter 7 – Phytochemicals in the Prevention of Ethanol-Induced Hepatotoxicity: A Revisit. https://doi.org/10.1016/B978-0-12-814466-4.00007-0

[1] P.Padmanabhan, A.Cheema, G.Paliyath: Solanaceous Fruits Including Tomato, Eggplant, and Peppers. https://doi.org/10.1016/B978-0-12-384947-2.00696-6

[2] Manjeshwar ShrinathBaliga, Arnadi RamachandrayyaShivashankara, SunithaVenkatesh, Harshith P.Bhat, Princy LouisPalatty, GaneshBhandari, SureshRao: Dietary Interventions in Liver Disease Foods, Nutrients, and Dietary Supplements 2019, Pages 79-89; Chapter 7 – Phytochemicals in the Prevention of Ethanol-Induced Hepatotoxicity: A Revisit. https://doi.org/10.1016/B978-0-12-814466-4.00007-0